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#grafiti #art

part one of 3

My sons art class took a canvas that had been vandalized and turned it into a work of art

part 3 will be on ontario canada news tonight

my son is wearing these white sun glasses with the completed art in the frame and interviewed by

CTV london ont canada news at 6

and the final product a proud mom i am of my indigo child who helped paint this

news segment shows phenix rising flame and the robot in bottom right corner means growth transformation

a proud mom

http://london.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=384667&b…

http://london.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=384667&b…

A threat to school safety in Wiarton, Ont. has been transformed into something positive, a student work of art. Scott Miller has the details

NEWS LOCAL

Students turn threatening graffiti into a work of art

Nelson Phillips, Wiarton Echo

Thursday, June 19, 2014 2:53:51 EDT PM

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From left to right: Austin Cutting, Brendin Wright, Kendra Schultz, Billy Goodkat,((((((( John Watkins,)))))))

Gabe Keeshig, and Hannah Hill – except for Goodkat, all are members of Mrs. McDougall’s visual arts class that helped to create the collaborative art project. Nelson Phillips/QMI Agency photo.

From left to right: Austin Cutting, Brendin Wright, Kendra Schultz, Billy Goodkat, John Watkins, Gabe Keeshig, and Hannah Hill – except for Goodkat, all are members of Mrs. McDougall’s visual arts class that helped to create the collaborative art project. Nelson Phillips/QMI Agency photo.

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A group of visual art students from Peninsula Shores District School, along with the collaborative help of newly local graffiti artist Billy Goodkat, have transformed a vandals hateful graffiti message plastered across a storage trailer at the back of the school’s property, into a stunning work of art that the school can be proud of.

“We all sat down and came up with a design,” said Goodkat, originally a native of Belfast, Northern Ireland. “The message is about awakening and it is supposed to pan from right to left. This project came out of what was a pretty negative message – we’ve got the school’s mascot which is a Phoenix, rising out of the ashes of this desolate landscape and flying over to a lush environment on the left.”

In early November 2013 students and faculty came to the school only to find a message spray-painted on a storage trailer saying, “when the lights go out on Nov. 13, the innocent will die.” PSDS’s principal estimated that as many as 600 students were kept home as parents grew worried over severity of the message.

“All the students and the teachers felt like a statement had to be made. It was so extreme and put the scare into some people. It’s about putting a new face on it, and showing what the school’s really about,” said Goodkat.

Most of the students had never spray-painted before, and with Goodkat’s help, managed to turn the message into a stunning landscape that visual arts teacher Kelly McDougall says helped her students embrace their creative side. Goodkat viewed himself as a supportive artistic presence throughout the project, helping to accent the students work, rather than paint over what they had done.

“Most of the stuff was painted by the kids. I’m only here to help by adding and developing it. For instance, John here did the tree trunk. It’s been a great collaborative effort. All in all, it’s a very poetic project.”

“Originally we had eight students, and came up with this collaborative process and how this would respond to the negative graffiti – but also speak to who we are as a school and what we value. It was so nice to see them all up there with spray-cans. We’ve talked about graffiti art, and we’ve mimicked graffiti art in my classes with stencils and spray-paint, but we’ve never had the opportunity to work on a project like this and work with a professional artist,” said McDougall.

Goodkat said that graffiti has seen its fair share of negative stereotypes in the past, manifesting from senseless tagging and vandalism like the message found at PSDS, but views the style of art as a very useful creative outlet. McDougall says that a big number of students in phys-ed classes and other classes that find themselves outside have come over to ask questions, explore the project and even try spray-painting themselves.

Goodkat concluded, “it’s been frowned upon for quite a while, but I think slowly people are getting out of that mind set and can see the potential of it. You can create beautiful pieces with it.”

Posted in: Healing,
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